Helmets to Hardhats Program has Served Thousands of Veterans

December 11, 2012 - Newly released statistics show that Helmets to Hardhats, the Building Trades’ program to assist returning military veterans transitioning to civilian life by helping them find good careers in the construction industry, has resulted in quality construction careers for thousands of veterans. The program is administered by the Center for Military Recruitment, Assessment and Veterans Employment, a joint labor-management committee. Funding is from private foundations, employers, employer associations and unions.

Through its website, www.helmetstohardhats.org, the program links construction employers looking for quality employees with military veterans interested in working in the trades.

Since 2007, the program, in partnership with the Building Trades, has verified the placement of 5,887 veterans into construction jobs, including more than 200 “Wounded Warriors” reporting at least 30 percent disability. Additionally, during that same span, the program has invested $124 million in the training and education of these apprentices, which is an average of $21,000 per placement. The website has been visited by1.4 million people, and 100,000 veterans have registered on the site. Year-by-year statistics follow.

We include Helmets to Hardhats provisions in every PLA we negotiate. It is vital to repeatedly educate our local public officials on the Building Trades’ ongoing effort to assist our veterans. This information shows the distinction between the Building Trades way, and the corner-cutting low road path to substandard wages without a path to a real career. Please provide the attached information to local public agencies with whom you have agreements that include Helmets to Hardhats.

 

H2H Productivity Numbers

 

Year

Unique Visitors

Registered Veterans

Wounded Warriors Registered

Page Views

Career Searches

Veterans Placed

Wounded Warriors Placed

Dollars

Invested[1][2]

2007[3]

194,086

18,731

197[4]

2,016,481

107,706

1561

[5]

$35,014,500

2008

279,707

21,694

1,582

3,152,425

173,232

1739

79

$33,505,500

2009

321,166

26,060

1,689

5,204,238

107,599

1056

59

$20,614,500

2010

364,388

19,089

1,251

5,498,943

165,123

869

35

$16,755,500

2011[6]

241,608

14,344

1,009

3,672,450

120,627

662

53

$18,101,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Defined Values

Unique Visitors - Number of individuals who visited the site during the report interval.  If someone visits more than once, that person is counted only the first time he or she visits.

Registered Veterans- Number of individuals that created an account on the Helmet to Hardhats website.

Wounded Warriors Registered- The number of “Registered Veterans” that claim a 30% or more disability rating.  This reporting is optional to the user.

Page Views- A hit to any file classified as a page. In order to view a web page with embedded images, for example, a browser must retrieve multiple files. The page and its embedded files counts as a single page view.

Career Searches- Number of individuals that searched for careers on the site.  This number does not take into account the possibility of multiple searches conducted by the individual.

Dollars Invested– The amount of money that will be spent education the apprentice over the span of a 3-5 year apprenticeship.

Veterans Placed– The number individuals reported to Helmets to Hardhats as indentured or employed.

Wounded Warriors Placed– The number individuals reported to Helmets to Hardhats as indentured or employed that claimed to have 30% or more disability rating.  This number is not in addition to the number of “Veterans Placed.”


[1] Based on cost to train an apprentice per year in 2008

[2] Costs to train an apprentice vary with trade and location in the U.S.; this is an average number

[3] Includes only 11 months of data due to a change in website providers at the beginning of the year

[4] Incomplete data due to the program’s October inception

[5] No data was collected due to the program’s October inception

[6] Apprenticeship costs updated to 2011
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